How Not to Sound/Talk/Write Like a Sexist Jerk — A Guide (TIME)

STEP ONE: Reverse the gender of the subject of your article/paper/sentence.
STEP TWO: See if it sounds funny.
STEP THREE: If it does, choose another word.

Easy, right? H/t Flip the News.

How Not to Sound/Talk/Write Like a Sexist Jerk — A Guide (TIME)

STEP ONE: Reverse the gender of the subject of your article/paper/sentence.

STEP TWO: See if it sounds funny.

STEP THREE: If it does, choose another word.

Easy, right? H/t Flip the News.

(Source: jessbennett)

Will Lean In & Getty Rid the World of the Media’s Subtle Sexism?
Also: Buzzfeed: 44 Stock Photos to Change How We Look at WomenNY Mag: The Curator of Lean In/Getty’s Feminist Stock PhotosJezebel: Lean In & Getty Aim to Diversity Stock PhotosBusinessweek: Making Stock Photos Less SexistNY Times: Changing Women’s Portrayal in Stock Photos

Will Lean In & Getty Rid the World of the Media’s Subtle Sexism?

Also: 
Buzzfeed: 44 Stock Photos to Change How We Look at Women
NY Mag: The Curator of Lean In/Getty’s Feminist Stock Photos
Jezebel: Lean In & Getty Aim to Diversity Stock Photos
Businessweek: Making Stock Photos Less Sexist
NY Times: Changing Women’s Portrayal in Stock Photos

(Source: jessbennett)

jessbennett:

"The typical typist was a liberated woman … She was a high flier in her day. She had achieved first class honours in philosophy from Oxford and was a skilled linguist.”

BBC Magazine, on how the typewriter brought women into the workplace

ARGH. This is a) unacceptable, and b) so. fucking. preventable. See: SheSource, The Li.st, The OpEd Project, POWER Sources Project, LadyJournos.
Still: this is bigger than a sourcing problem. This is a byline problem, a Style section problem, a language problem, a trend story problem, a lazy journalism problem, an oversimplification problem. Also: I fundamentally reject the notion that women are less likely to want to be quoted.
There are free online databases to check for plagiarism. Maybe what we need is a free online database to check for dumbass, avoidable gender bias. 


In an analysis of 352 front-page stories from the January and February of this year, a study found that the New York Times quoted more than three times as many male as female sources. Read more at Poynter

ARGH. This is a) unacceptable, and b) so. fucking. preventable. See: SheSourceThe Li.stThe OpEd ProjectPOWER Sources ProjectLadyJournos.

Still: this is bigger than a sourcing problem. This is a byline problem, a Style section problem, a language problem, a trend story problem, a lazy journalism problem, an oversimplification problem. Also: I fundamentally reject the notion that women are less likely to want to be quoted.

There are free online databases to check for plagiarism. Maybe what we need is a free online database to check for dumbass, avoidable gender bias. 

In an analysis of 352 front-page stories from the January and February of this year, a study found that the New York Times quoted more than three times as many male as female sources. Read more at Poynter

(Source: leanin, via jessbennett)

Sisterhood of the Traveling Pink Sneakers (NY Mag)
Or: How Wendy Davis’s “rouge-red” Mizunos became an insta-badge of feminism.

Image from benjameme

Sisterhood of the Traveling Pink Sneakers (NY Mag)

Or: How Wendy Davis’s “rouge-red” Mizunos became an insta-badge of feminism.

Image from benjameme

Fifty years ago today, on June 10, 1963, President John F. Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act into law, requiring men and women be paid equally for equal work. Argue the statistics whichever way you want, but the pay gap persists. White women earn, on average, 77 cents to the white male dollar. Black woman earn 69 cents, and Latina women earn 57 cents. (Infographic by Emily Nemens for LeanIn.Org.)

Fifty years ago today, on June 10, 1963, President John F. Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act into law, requiring men and women be paid equally for equal work. Argue the statistics whichever way you want, but the pay gap persists. White women earn, on average, 77 cents to the white male dollar. Black woman earn 69 cents, and Latina women earn 57 cents. (Infographic by Emily Nemens for LeanIn.Org.)

(Source: leanin, via jessbennett)

ifuwerentafraid:

What Would You Do If You Weren’t Afraid?

Over the next month, more than 1 million women in this country will graduate from college. They will enter the workforce with higher GPAs than their male peers. Many will continue on to earn advanced degrees. For these bright young women, the world is their oyster.

Or is it?

Studies show that even after college, women are less ambitious than their male peers. They avoid leadership roles. They are afraid to speak up. 

Why do women harbor such fear? Why are they afraid to raise their hands? We asked young women to answer the question: What would you do if you weren’t afraid?The answers were inspiring, staggering, enlightening, eye-opening.

Now we want you to share your story. What would you do if you weren’t afraid? And why aren’t you doing it already?

Share your story. Overcome your fear.

ifuwerentafraid:

Tiffany: “If I weren’t afraid, I would ask more questions and speak up.”

Share your story. Overcome your fear.

ifuwerentafraid:

Tiffany: “If I weren’t afraid, I would ask more questions and speak up.”

Share your story. Overcome your fear.

The XO Factor: When Did Email XO-ing Become the Standard Among Powerful Working Women? (The Atlantic)
womenofthe112th:

Infographic #3: Geographic distribution of the Women of the 112th Congress

womenofthe112th:

Infographic #3: Geographic distribution of the Women of the 112th Congress

Women of Protest: A Feminist History Refresher  

It wasn’t until 1920 that women were granted suffrage, but it was 1917 when members of the National Women’s Party — Alice Paul, Lucy Burns and others — picketed outside the White House, burning copies of Woodrow Wilson’s speeches and demanding the right to vote. What resulted — mass arrests (most for “obstructing traffic”), unlawful imprisonment and bloody beatings — became known as the Night of Terror, though it’s fair to say most among my generation don’t know it.

The Night of Terror took place on Nov. 15, 1917, when the warden at the Workhouse Prison, in Occoquan, Virginia, ordered his guards to teach the suffragists a lesson. For weeks, the women’s only water had come from an open pail. Their food had been infested with worms. But on this night, some 40 prison guards wielding clubs beat the women senseless — grabbing, dragging, choking, kicking and pinching them, according to affidavits recounting the attacks. 

Read More

coolchicksfromhistory:

November is Native American Heritage Month

All photos by Edward S. Curtis via the Library of Congress, original captions:

Top: O Che Che, Mohave Indian womanQahatika girlSelawik Woman

Middle: Chaiwa—TewaKlamath womanCayuse woman

Bottom: Wisham femaleTsawatenok girlYaqui girl

In light of today’s news, a few iconic Newsweek covers from the 60s and 70s.

(Source: jessbennett)

"‘Life-work balance’ is a nonsense term. The idea that I have to segment work and life is based on some archaic lunar-calendar thing."

— NY Times: Housecleaning — Provided by the Boss? In Silicon Valley, Perks Come Home. «awesome» 

(Source: jessbennett)